Close

02/05/2021

What are Athens and Sparta known for respectively?

What are Athens and Sparta known for respectively?

The city-states of Athens and Sparta are the best representatives of democracy and oligarchy, respectively. These factors empowered Sparta and led to the development of an authoritative and potent state. Other contrasting issues included women’s rights, social classes, and value of human life.

How do Athens and Sparta help us understand the culture of ancient Greece?

While the Spartans were content to give military aid to Greece, Athens wanted more lands from Greece which eventually led to war among all the Greeks and which Sparta ultimately won. They let the Athens keep their traditions and culture a long as they no longer wanted to rule their fellow Greeks.

Who was more powerful Romans or Spartans?

Sparta was the most feared city state in the known world to the point even Alexander refused to attempt to conquer them. Rome the biggest Empire at the time, its military was 2nd to non but defeated Sparta when the city state was at its weakest.

Did the Vikings ever fight the Spartans?

Vikings can shoot at the Spartans since Spartans don’t believe in long range warfare, but that won’t work out too well in the end. Round 2: Vikings were excellent fighters, much like Spartans. In comparison, Spartans fought in larger scale battles as a united and organized force.

Who would win in a fight Vikings or Romans?

Assuming we take a typical Viking army (let’s say the Great Heathen Army, one of the biggest Norse armies ever assembled) and a typical roman legion (five thousand men from, say, the early imperial period – late first century CE). In short, the Romans would’ve crushed them.

Who stopped the Mongols?

Kublai Khan. Kublai Khan came to power in 1260. By 1271 he had renamed the Empire the Yuan Dynasty and conquered the Song dynasty and with it, all of China. However, Chinese forces ultimately overthrew the Mongols to form the Ming Dynasty.

Why were the Mongols so successful?

Owing to their adaptability, their skill in communications, and their reputation for ferocity, the Mongols swept across Eurasia over the 13th and 14th centuries, quickly assembling the largest contiguous empire in world history.