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06/02/2021

What are the first 10 amendments in the Bill of Rights?

What are the first 10 amendments in the Bill of Rights?

Ten Amendments

  • Freedom of speech.
  • Freedom of the press.
  • Freedom of religion.
  • Freedom of assembly.
  • Right to petition the government.

What is the 9th amendment in simple terms?

The Ninth Amendment was part of the Bill of Rights that was added to the Constitution on December 15, 1791. It says that all the rights not listed in the Constitution belong to the people, not the government. In other words, the rights of the people are not limited to just the rights listed in the Constitution.

When was the 9th amendment violated?

1947

When was the 9th amendment used in court?

1965

What does Article 1 Section 10 prevent states from doing?

Article I, Section 10, limits the power of the states. States may not enter into a treaty with a foreign nation; that power is given to the president, with the advice and consent of two-thirds of the Senate present. States cannot make their own money, nor can they grant any title of nobility.

What can states do that the government Cannot?

Only the federal government can coin money, regulate the mail, declare war, or conduct foreign affairs. So long as their laws do not contradict national laws, state governments can prescribe policies on commerce, taxation, healthcare, education, and many other issues within their state.

What power do states not have?

The powers denied to the states are specified in an even shorter list in Article I, Section 10. These include: No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confederation; coin money; emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts;…

Can states violate the Constitution?

State or local laws held to be preempted by federal law are void not because they contravene any provision of the Constitution, but rather because they conflict with a federal statute or treaty, and through operation of the Supremacy Clause.

Does state law supersede the Constitution?

The Supremacy Clause of the Constitution of the United States (Article VI, Clause 2), establishes that the Constitution, federal laws made pursuant to it, and treaties made under its authority, constitute the “supreme Law of the Land”, and thus take priority over any conflicting state laws.