What does sweet as mean in Australia?

What does sweet as mean in Australia?

20. Sweet as: sweet, awesome. Aussies will often put ‘as’ at the end of adjectives to give it emphasis. Other examples include lazy as, lovely as, fast as and common as.

How do you say good luck in Australian slang?

Chockie/Choccy: Chocolate, the best thing ever. Chookas: Means “Break a leg” or “all the best”. Used to wish a performer good luck. For example, “Chookas for the big night!”

What part of Australia has the strongest accent?

Regional Tasmania

What is Australian slang for excellent?

Aussie Slang

Phrase/term Meaning
Ace great, excellent
Ankle-biter child
Arvo afternoon
Barbie barbeque

What do Aussies call their girlfriends?

The “missus” is one term used by many Australian males for their wives (married or de facto). There are a number of rhyming slang expressions for missus/wife. More correct terms are “my partner” for people living in a de facto relationship or just simply “my wife” or “my husband” for people that are legally married.

Why do Aussies say mate?

In Australia, a ‘mate’ is more than just a friend and is a term that implies a sense of shared experience, mutual respect and unconditional assistance.

Is there a posh Australian accent?

Upper and upper middle class Australians are likelier to speak in a cultured Australian accent, our posh accent. There are a few regional variations, but that is mostly in vocabulary than in accent. Malcolm turnbull has a modern posh accent.

Is there a Sydney accent?

Some of the particular accents that are identifiable are: Sydney – an accent with some Cockney features. You cannot, however, use this particular phonemic use as an identifier for Sydney, because it is also heard on working class people from Adelaide and some other parts of South Australia.

How do you describe an Australian accent?

Distinctive features of the Aussie accent The Australian accent is famous for its vowel sounds, absence of a strong “r” pronunciation and the use of an inflection – or intonation – at the end of sentences, which can make statements sound like questions.