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06/07/2021

What is the right to remain silent in the 5th Amendment?

What is the right to remain silent in the 5th Amendment?

The Right to Remain Silent The Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects people from being compelled to give testimony that could incriminate them. This is not the same as saying that a person has a right to silence at all times. In some situations, police may use silence itself as incriminating evidence.

Do you really have the right to remain silent?

In the Miranda decision, the Supreme Court spelled out the substance of the warnings that officers are required to give to you, either in writing or orally, before questioning you: You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in court. (5th Amendment)

Who has right to remain silent?

The typical warning states: You have the right to remain silent and refuse to answer questions. Anything you say may be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to consult an attorney before speaking to the police and to have an attorney present during questioning now or in the future.

Is there a polite way to say none of your business?

use statements that begin with “I” and do not use the word “you.” “I would rather not get into that subject.” When you say things like “Why would YOU ask?” or “That is none of YOUR business.” It can easily be interpreted as a subliminal attack (like you are saying they are a jerk for asking.)

What is a nice way to say none of your business?

Here are some options that are civil and suitable for anyone, though tone will decide whether you sound hostile or friendly as you say them:

  • “I don’t want to discuss that.”
  • “I’d rather not answer that.”
  • “That’s not a topic I’d like to dwell on.”
  • “I’m sorry, but I don’t want to talk about that.”

How do you respond smartly?

Stand still, relax, think about your answer and then respond. Don’t feel pressured to answer quickly. Thoughtfully considering your response is a sign of poise.