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03/30/2021

Where can we get reliable health information?

Where can we get reliable health information?

Where Can I Find Reliable Health Information Online? The National Institutes of Health website is a good place to start for reliable health information. As a rule, health websites sponsored by Federal Government agencies are good sources of information. You can reach all Federal websites by visiting www.usa.gov.

Is Healthline a trustworthy source?

All Healthline content is medically reviewed or fact checked to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible. We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable media sites, academic research institutions and, whenever possible, medically peer reviewed studies.

Is WebMD trustworthy?

While WebMD itself is a for-profit business that does not need accreditation or licensure as an institution, its content is “ a credible, authoritative source of health information,” according to its editorial policy.

What are the unreliable sources of health information?

Unreliable sources:Faith healers.witch doctors.blogs.unreputable internet sites.

How can you determine whether the source of health information and products is reliable?

There are several main criteria for determining whether a source is reliable or not.1) Accuracy. Verify the information you already know against the information found in the source. 2) Authority. Make sure the source is written by a trustworthy author and/or institution. 3) Currency. 4) Coverage.

What is the difference between reliable and unreliable sources of health information?

Explanation: Reliable information and products are those are trusted and verified by health experts, while unreliable ones are red flagged by health experts because of they’re unsafe and can’t be trusted.

Who are the rights sources of health information?

The primary independent variables were utilization of health information from sources within two categories: (1) mass media, which includes Internet, TV, print media (i.e., newspapers and magazines); and (2) interpersonal sources, which includes healthcare providers and non–health professional social networks.