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06/03/2021

Why did the US actually invade Iraq?

Why did the US actually invade Iraq?

The US stated that the intent was to remove “a regime that developed and used weapons of mass destruction, that harbored and supported terrorists, committed outrageous human rights abuses, and defied the just demands of the United Nations and the world.” For the invasion of Iraq the rationale was “the United States …

Does the United States have the right to intervene in the affairs of another country?

The United Nations Charter and the Charter of the Organization of American States forbid only intervention by states. No State or group of States has the right to intervene, directly or in- directly, for any reason whatever, in the internal or external affairs of any other State.

What if the French did not help America?

Without France, America would not have won independence. Had the War of Independence failed, it would have simmered until the Americans were strong enough to push England off, like during the Napoleonic Wars, which took the combined powers of England, Prussia, Austria and Russia 25 years to defeat France.

Could the US win without France?

It is highly improbable that the United States could have won its independence without the assistance of France, Spain, and Holland. Fearful of losing its sugar colonies in the West Indies, Britain was unable to concentrate its military forces in the American colonies.

What if the French never helped us in the Revolutionary War?

Plainly stated, if France hadn’t supported the United States during the American Revolution, there wouldn’t be a United States today. George Washington was a great general, but the Continental Army simply didn’t have the money, men, training, or seafaring vessels necessary to defeat the British.

Did France help us in Revolutionary War?

France provided the money, troops, armament, military leadership, and naval support that tipped the balance of military power in favor of the United States and paved the way for the Continental Army’s ultimate victory, which was sealed at Yorktown, VA, five years after Franklin embarked on his mission.

What was the greatest danger faced by American soldiers at Valley Forge?

Cold and starvation at Valley Forge were not even the most dangerous threats: diseases proved to be the biggest killer. As the National Park Service says, “Disease was the true scourge of the camp.” By the end of the six-month encampment, some 2,000 men—roughly one in six—died of disease.